Cat Desexing Request

Desexing Programme Information

The Cats Protection League (Wgtn) Inc (CPL) sees desexing cats as an important step to reducing the number of unwanted kittens born every year. We understand that the cost of the desexing operation is the reason some owners have not had their cats desexed, and so we would like to help by offering subsidized desexing. Please read the following information carefully.

To be eligible for assistance

Both CPL funds and vet clinic availability are limited, and so the desexing programme is only available to those with a Community Services Card or Student ID, and must live within the ‘04’ calling area.

The cost to you for the operation is $30 to neuter a male cat and $50 to spay a female cat. The fee is payable directly to the vet on the morning of the surgery. If during the operation a female cat is found to be pregnant (6 weeks or under) you will need to pay an additional $20 as the operation is more complex and time consuming. Flea treatment, if needed, is included in the desexing fee.

If you meet our eligibility criteria, please continue and complete the form. If you do not have a Community Services Card or Student ID, but genuinely cannot afford to get your cat desexed at normal vet rates, please email us at cpldesexing@gmail.com and tell us why you need our help. We'll get back to you with a decision asap.

Desexing Request

General Information

DESEXING PROGRAMME INFORMATION (CATS PROTECTION LEAGUE (WGTN) INC)

The Cats Protection League (Wgtn) Inc (CPL) sees desexing cats as an important step to reducing the number of unwanted kittens born every year.  We understand that the cost of the desexing operation is the reason some owners have not had their cats desexed, and so we would like to help by offering subsidized desexing.  Please read the following information carefully.

TO BE ELIGIBILE FOR ASSISTANCE

  • Both CPL funds and vet clinic availability are limited, and so the desexing programme is only available to those with a Community Services Card or Student ID, and must live within the ‘04’ calling area.
  • The cost to you for the operation is $30 to neuter a male cat and $50 to spay a female cat. The fee is payable directly to the vet on the morning of the surgery.  If during the operation a female cat is found to be pregnant (6 weeks or under) you will need to pay an additional $20 as the operation is more complex and time consuming. Flea treatment, if needed, is included in the desexing fee.

BEFORE YOUR APPOINTMENT

Choose your closest vet

  • We have several vets who are generously assisting us with our desexing programme.  These vets are listed on the application form, and you need to tick which vet practice you would like to take your cat to.  Neither CPL nor the vet can transport your cat to and from the clinic. You need to arrange this yourself. For the following vets, the cat will need to arrive at the vet clinic on the day of the surgery between:
    • Tasman Street Vet: 8.00am and 9.00am
    • PetVet Silverstream: 7:30am and 8:30am
    • CareVets Johnsonville, Porirua and Kapiti: 8.00am and 9.00am

Read, sign, and return the form

  • The application form gives us the information we need from you, and also gives you the rules you need to agree to by signing.  Once CPL receives the signed form, we will pass your details to the vet clinic.  The clinic will then call you to book a suitable day for the operation to take place.

GET YOUR CAT READY

To ensure your cat is safe during surgery

  • Your cat must be at least 5 months old
  • Your cat must not eat anything from 8pm the night before the operation. This is to make sure the cat does not get sick during surgery, which can be very dangerous. If your cat does eat after 8pm you need to call the vet to let them know.

The vet clinic will remind you of this when they set up the appointment.  They will also give you post op instructions, and let you know when you should come back to have stitches removed.

  • Keep your cat inside the night before the desexing appointment to ensure they are not missing when you need to cage them in the morning, and to ensure they do not eat after 8pm from a source outside your home.

To stop your female cat from getting pregnant before surgery

  • The best way to ensure your female cat does not get pregnant before surgery is to make sure she is kept inside and away from undesexed male cats. 

If your cat is pregnant

  • If the cat is 6 weeks or less pregnant, the operation will go ahead as scheduled but it will cost an additional $20. This additional fee will need to be paid when you pick your cat up.
  • If the cat is over 6 weeks pregnant, the vet will not be able to spay the cat. You will need to wait until after the cat gives birth and the kittens are weaned before getting her desexed.

Most Importantly

If something unexpected happens and you are not able to make the scheduled appointment please call and let the vet clinic know as soon as possible.  They can then use that time for someone else.  If you do not turn up for your appointment, and do not call to let the clinic know, we may not be able to continue to assist you.

If you have any questions about any of this information please call 3899668 or email cpldesexing@gmail.com.

STRAY CATS INFORMATION SHEET (CATS PROTECTION LEAGUE (WGTN) INC)

Thank you for your enquiry about the desexing of a stray cat.  Strays are a little different to owned cats, so we have put this information sheet together to help you, and Cats Protection League Wellington (CPL), try to avoid any potential issues.

Firstly… you need to be sure the cat is actually a stray. Sometimes cats that look like strays are well cared for owned cats with a long term or age related illness, or they have several ‘homes’ in the neighbourhood.  Have you checked www.petsonthenet.co.nz in the lost cat section? Asked around your neighbours? Put a paper collar with your phone number on it asking the owner to call you? (only possible if the cat is handleable)

Once you are sure the cat is a stray, and if you meet the desexing scheme eligibility criteria, you can apply for the cat to be desexed.  When you take the cat to the vet clinic you will need to sign a general anaesthetic consent form as the carer of the cat.  You need to be able to keep the cat indoors while they recover – this could be up to 14 days for females to prevent infection or hernia. During their pre-op checks the vet may find other health issues.  Stray cats are at greater risk of FIV, or there could be problems such as bad teeth, kidney disease, etc.

FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus)…  FIV is similar to HIV in humans and can progress to Feline Aids. FIV cannot be transmitted to people, but is passed to other cats through bite wounds.  FIV can cause severe health problems for cats.  The cat’s immune system is compromised over several years, and while some cats show no obvious signs of the disease, others could develop weight loss, diarrhoea, painful gums and dental disease, eye problems, chronic infections and neurological disease.  As the cat’s immune system is too weak to fight off infections they are at risk of prolonged illness, poor quality of life and premature death.

All strays being desexed through CPL will be assessed by the vet as to whether they are at risk of being FIV positive and if so an on the spot test will be carried out at CPL cost.  (Please note that if they are not considered at high risk this is not a guarantee they do not have FIV). If the test is positive, and the cat is unhandleable, our recommendation is humane euthanasia to prevent future suffering of the cat and likely transmission to other cats.  Your desexing fee would be put towards the cost of euthanasia and CPL would cover any remaining cost.

For handleable strays that test positive for FIV you need to consider the risk to other cats (including possibly your own), whether you could keep the cat inside to prevent spread to other cats (CPL recommendation is that all FIV cats be kept as indoor only), whether you will be able to monitor the cats health on a regular ongoing basis including vet treatment if needed. 

Other health issues… Health issues can be short term and easily treatable, or ongoing. You need to be prepared that you may need to make a decision on the day of surgery based on the advice of the vet.  For example, if a largely unhandleable cat is found to need ongoing medication this is not a viable situation.

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